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Archive for the ‘art’ Category

jenny holzer is designing a line of sneakers for keds, to sponsor the whitney.

they’re very simple, subtler than most clothes with words on them, and at $70, not insanely overpriced either (kinda). this is what they look like:

 

 

sorta cute, right?

 

either way i really like jenny holzer, she’s that artist who projects words and snappy sayings on a variety of surfaces. seriously snappy.

 

(at moma)

Jenny Holzer, Selections from Inflammatory Essays (1979-82), Survival (1983-85), Living (1980-82) (English)

 

Jenny Holzer, Selection from the Survival Series: Use What is Dominant...”

 

Jenny Holzer, You Are My Own(from artnet)

 

i can’t tell if she’s less angsty or maybe just more complacent about her angst, than barbara kruger. either way, reading her words always makes me say “hm” or “ph” or some other monosyllabic but pleasant thinking sort of noise. she’s in most every museum with a contemporary-type collection. recommend.

[ stefanie ]

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holy shit, these shoes are so fantastic:

am also wild about this silhouette for the summer, from ysl resort 2011:

it’s like the grown-up version of low rise pants + belly shirt (i’m not the only one who wore some variation of that outfit throughout highschool, right?), a way to show summer skin without being summer trashy, and also is much more flattering than previous incarnations of midriff-baring ensembles.

a final thought, is that i recently started volunteering at a arts program for adults with developmental disabilities, and it’s really really wonderful, and has also gotten me back into making art regularly, which i haven’t been doing in a while. the emphasis at the program is about process and mindfulness, not a finished product, and while it’s easy to remember that it’s the making and not the thing that’s important when painting with low-functioning individuals (most of their work isn’t even a little bit figurative, it’s mostly swaths of muddy color and no one really bothers to take any pieces home), the rest of us tend to be really hard on ourselves. it’s bad elementary school art teachers’ faults, really, for conditioning us to create with an end result in mind instead of making art for the feeling and the experience. so, friends, i encourage you to paint with your eyes closed, to collage with color instead of form, to sculpt with your feet, and to embrace your inner pollack. it will come out ugly but it won’t matter, the best art experience is like meditation anyway. do it do it

[ stefanie ]

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here’s a nice article to make you feel intellectually superior to all the employed econ majors you know.

 

also let’s take a minute for louise bourgeois, who died last week after almost a century of creating art of all shapes and sizes, who was still creating oozing guttural imploring encompassing emotional sculptures and drawings well into her eighties, what a cool lady right?

 

(louise with her 1970 sculpture eye to eye, from le centre pompidou)

 

(legs, 1986, the hirshhorn)

 

(10am is when you come to me)

 

(donne ou prend, 2002, tate modern)

 

her art is about “consider[ing] the whole range of intimacy, desire, and the human need to connect or belong, to be part of the family”. she has a drawing from 2007 that reads,

 

it is not so much

where my motivation comes from

but rather

how it manages

to survive

 

it’s wild how much her childhood affected her; she had enough pent up emotion to fuel 70 or so years of prolific art making.

 

another melancholy but appealing line from a 1947 drawing, il disparut dans un silence total, that was hanging at her pompidou retrospective in 2008:

 

he was of a quiet nature and rather intelligent but he was not interested in being loved or protected because he was interested in something else

 

she was very special & let’s all love the pieces she’s left behind.

 

[ stefanie ]

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this recording reviewed paper cone stories, an event i’ve never heard of but may or may not be hosted by a present-or-past girlfriend of a boy i used to know. anyway the synopses of readings seem both apt and witty and worth listening to. someone named akiva gottlieb was talking about the man who grabbed the backside of one of abramovic’s performers and this is what he said:

For certain liberal arts school graduates, the Abramovic retrospective is our Woodstock, the cultural happening that enables us to stare meaningfully into the eyes of strangers, brush against body parts, watch women run through a muddy field while stripping off layers of clothing, and generally revel in the various possibilities of naked flesh under the guise of an artistic experience. It’s a lot like ChatRoulette, actually, and it’s making New York very comfortable.

 

also while visiting the college graduation of some friends this past weekend i was lucky enough to meet a former housemate’s 16-year-old brother, a young man sporting an eyebrow ring and jeggings. he had recently seen the retrospective and an interesting conversation about nudity and voyeurism in art ensued until all of a sudden he remembered he was only 16 and was all “yeah dude it was so weird squeezing between naked people especially cuz one of them was a dude heh heh heh it was kinda hot though”. then i wondered if all of my cultural and sociological musings are for real or if i’m merely trying to prove to myself that i’m not, in fact, a 16-year-old boy laughing about naked people and covering up these oh-so-base instincts with lofty vocabulary and concepts borrowed from an art history textbook.

art is weird man especially when it has no clothes.

[ stefanie ]

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a little while ago i rambled about marina abramovic’s current exhibition at moma, but my research was faulty and i didn’t realize how many (approximately 50!) pieces were actually part of the artist is present. in the title work, ms abramovic sits for seven hours a day and viewers are allowed to sit across from her for as long as they’d like, and stare at her. she stares back. some weirdos sit for over an hour. moma posts the resultant portraits on its flickr page, and they provide for many minutes of weirdness and fascination!

Day 41, Marina Abramović by MoMA The Museum of Modern Art.

Day 40, Portrait 3 by MoMA The Museum of Modern Art.

Day 38, Portrait 10 by MoMA The Museum of Modern Art.

Day 38, Portrait 3 by MoMA The Museum of Modern Art.

Day 36, Portrait 9 by MoMA The Museum of Modern Art.

Day 30, Portrait 5 by MoMA The Museum of Modern Art.

Day 30, Portrait 2 by MoMA The Museum of Modern Art.

Day 10, Portrait 1 by MoMA The Museum of Modern Art.

 

everyone ends up crying, for some reason.

babies.

the portraits remind me of elf ludin’s photo project from darkness, and of andy warhol’s screen tests.

 

all of the images produce a false sense of intimacy bred from prolonged eye contact, and stuff. an act usually saved only for those with whom we feel an intense connection, rendered uncomfortable by proximity to a stranger and an awkward museum setting. also, some people are super weird looking, like human mr potato heads, and i wonder if marina abramovic notices.

 

[ stefanie ]

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love love love this photo,

posted by the sartorialist on monday.

it reminds me of fabric stores and the classroom in the theatre building where i took costume construction during college, and other locales where one can’t help but find themselves awash in hue. when i make art i usually find myself creating line drawings in ink or shadowy charcoal compositions, always in black and white, but whenever i’m at a museum i’m always drawn to the most colorful pieces, and i spend hours salivating in front of van gogh, rothko, and matisse, vowing to incorporate more color the next time i have a canvas in front of me.

(l’italienne, vincent van gogh)

Mark Rothko. Untitled. (1968)

(untitled, mark rothko)

spring is great because flowers bloom blah blah blah but the season also has such a nice light about it, making those flowers all the more beautiful but also lending a special sheen to rusty basketball hoops and not-yet-blooming trees and other previously dingy looking items that are really so colorful and beautiful if you take the time to look. few things are more inspirational than bright colors and odd color combinations, so LOOK AROUND and soak it in.

[ stefanie ]

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sophie blackall combines beautiful illustrations with craiglist’s always fascinating missed connections posts.

sometimes creepy stalkers + the internets + artsy drawings = the best

[ stefanie ]

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